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A Very Williamsburg Christmas

January 3, 2014

Christmas morning in my house looked a little bit like this…

Christmas Morning

We had a lovely, quiet, family-oriented day.  My Christmas “break” was about as low-key as it gets, but I did emerge from the house one morning to meet two of my oldest friends for brunch in Colonial Williamsburg.

Brunch in CW

Though my parents live in Williamsburg, I don’t usually spend that much time in the colonial area when I visit.  This time, I took a walk down Duke of Gloucester Street and loved taking in the period Christmas decorations.  I started in Merchant’s Square, the hub of the area filled with restaurants and shops.

Merchants Square Christmas

Merchants Square Christmas

When I left the hubbub of Merchant’s Square, the crowds thinned.  Along DoG (Duke of Gloucester) Street, the buildings are all from the colonial period and have been restored so that you feel like you’re stepping back in time as you stroll along.  If you’re able to ignore the tourists around you and the fact that you’re snapping photos with an iPhone, that is.

Duke of Gloucester Street

It was a gorgeous afternoon for a walk and I loved my stroll down memory lane.  CW is where my friends and I hung out frequently growing up, so walking around brought back some good memories.  I had to smile while passing the best climbing tree ever, where we used to scramble up to sit in the branches sipping frappucino-type beverages from the local coffee shop.

The tree colonial williamsburg

After passing “the tree,” I made my way past beautifully decorated homes and businesses.  In colonial days, homes were decorated with fresh fruit and greenery for the holidays.

Colonial Williamsburg Christmas Doors

It’s a nice change from our modern twinkly lights and such, don’t you think?

Colonial Williamsburg Chrismas

There is a competition for the best decorations on the street, and many of the buildings had blue or purple ribbons hanging next to their doors.  Apparently I cropped them out of all of my pictures, but trust me, they were there.  I bet a little friendly competition keeps people on their toes and helps keep the festive decor going strong from year to year.

Colonial Williamsburg Christmas

One of my favorite details of the buildings in this area is the signs that hang in front of the businesses.  Because so many people back in the day couldn’t read, the signs all have pictures showing what type of store they are.  Like the hat shop:

Colonial hat shop

And the apothecary:

Colonial apothecary

And my personal favorite, the grocer (that’s a golden pig):

Colonial grocer

After making my way past more taverns, homes and shops, I reached the end of the street and looped back toward my car.

Colonial Williamsburg tavern

It was a lovely way to stretch my legs and extend the holiday spirit a little longer.  I’m hoping to make it an annual tradition to walk around CW and view the Christmas decorations.

Colonial Williamsburg Christmas

Well that’s all from Williamsburg this trip!  It’s back to business as usual in the mountains for me for a while.  I hope you and yours had a wonderful holiday season and are looking forward to a fabulous 2014!

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2 Comments leave one →
  1. January 3, 2014 8:56 am

    Love the pajamas on Christmas! Very cool that Merchant’s Square has all those old signs indicating the stores out front- I would love if we kept that idea these days!

    • January 3, 2014 4:26 pm

      Thank you! Footie pajamas are WAY too comfortable and too much fun… I kind of can’t believe I’ve lived my whole adult life without them now 🙂

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